Blog Category: Success stories

Deborah Green is a Cree woman from Piapot First Nation in Saskatchewan, and has lived in Blackfoot Territory for the past 20 plus years. Deborah has spent her career working in recruitment and human resources, specializing in diversity and Indigenous recruitment. She has held positions as a recruiter at an Indigenous-owned staffing agency and within the oil and gas sector.

Ticking All the Right (YEG) Boxes

Category: Entrepreneurship Success stories

One year ago, Daphne and Lana’s business, YEG Box, was just a thought in their minds. The friends would often run together and talk about the local items they had recently bought. Anyone they gave a gift to would ask: “Where did you get this?!”, so they decided to turn their savvy for finding unique local goods into a business. YEG Box is a monthly subscription service, sending boxes full of goodies from local Edmonton makers to people all across the country.

Showcasing the beauty and resiliency of Indigenous artists

Category: Indigenous business Startup Success stories

Delree’s Native Art Gallery is located in the quaint town of Didsbury, 80 km north of Calgary. It opened October 6, 2015, which is also Delree’s mother’s birthday. Every year on October 6, they have a celebration in honour of her and her Birthday. Delree’s Iconic Sign hangs above her storefront adorned with one of her very first paintings: “Waiting for Grand Entry” – a rear view of a jingle dress dancer.

From Bartenders to Business Owners

Category: Entrepreneurship Startup Success stories

Have you ever been out hiking, fishing, or camping, and had a craving for a premium cocktail, but didn’t want to lug around the heavy ingredients? If that's the case, BarCountry is the company for you! The owners Mathieu and Kole are adventurers themselves, so they know packs are tight on space. All you need is a flask of your desired alcohol, some water, and one of their dehydrated cocktail mixers to enjoy your drink of choice at the end of a grueling day.

Building solid ground

Category: Indigenous business Success stories

When “working for the man” just wasn’t cutting it anymore, Justin Ladouceur and his partner Billy Kay believed they were capable enough to branch out on their own. Having grown up with exposure in and around construction sites, they decided to take a stab at it and forge their own path in the concrete business. Aside from skill and experience, the desire to build a better life for themselves and their families led them to starting their own concrete business, Advantage Concrete Solutions Ltd.

Turning obstacles into opportunities

Category: Indigenous business Business planning Operations Success stories

We had the pleasure of introducing you to our client Massey Whiteknife, a successful Indigenous business owner, in the June 2016 blog post: “First Nation entrepreneur stays true to himself”. His tremendously successful company, ICEIS Safety, continues to grow while Massey also takes time to pursue other interests.

Keeping a tough hide in the textiles industry

Category: Entrepreneurship Success stories

Kyle Closen's roots are in the prairies. He grew up on a farm in Saskatchewan with fond memories of working at his grandparents’ upholstery shop, an experience that opened him up to the world of textiles. While he’s worked in other areas during his professional life – having been a truck driver and welder – he always came back to his passion of working with different materials and creating unique handmade items. He took the leap to start his own business in 2014 and Clo’s General Leather Co. was born.

Serving the needs of First Nations communities

Category: Indigenous business Startup Success stories

Going back to 1970, Virginia Bruneau recalls her father having a passion for his people. Being on the school committee and a counselor for Cold Lake First Nation, he and some colleagues went on a strike to get a new school for the community. The movement gained momentum, and three other reserves followed suit, giving recognition to Virginia’s father. In the end, all four reserves were approved for brand new schools.

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